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Boom Bop

Artist: Jean-Paul Bourelly

Date of Release: 03/03/2000

Catalogue no: 1428

Label: Jazz Magnet Records

Price: £6

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Track Listing

No

 

Title

Duration

1

 

Gumbe

7.28

2

 

New Afro Blu

9.52

3

 

Three Chambers of Diop

10.53

4

 

Silent Rain

7.37

5

 

Root One

3.09

6

 

Invisible Indivisible

7.34

7

 

Kinetic Threadness

7.03

8

 

Brother Boom Bap

1.55

9

 

Tara

6.38

10

 

Griot Sunset

1.16

 

 

 

 

Jean-Paul Bourelly (electric and acoustic bass, lead vocal, effects)
Abdourahmane Diop (vocals, drums)
Archie Shepp (tenor sax)
Henry Threadgill (alto sax)
Reggie Washington (bass)
Big Royal Talamacus (filtered boom bass)
Samba Sock (boograboo)
Slaka (jimbe)
Slam T. Wig (drums)

The Chicago-born, Haitian-American guitarist Jean-Paul Bourelly has traveled in many musical words: from jazz and rock to world music. On Boom Bop, Bourelly makes African ambient music that's equally at home on the Niger and Mississippi Rivers. Bourelly, a former sideman with Miles Davis, Rod Stewart, and Roy Haynes, is joined by jazz legends tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp, alto sax wizard Henry Threadgill, bassist Reggie Washington, and the Senegalese master drummer and griot Abdourahmane Diop. Beyond the standard jazz- or rock-band breakdown of instruments, though, there's more. Big Royal Talamacus plays "filtered boom bass," Samba Sock plays boograboo, Slaka plays the djembe, and Slam T. Wig hammers on the standard drum kit. Bourelly's Jimi Hendrix-tinted electric guitar lines beautifully counterpoint Diop's impassioned vocals and ancestral rhythms on "New Afro Blu." Elsewhere, Bourelly grooves with funky backbeats, as on "Silent Rain," which is laced wonderfully with Threadgill's lyrical lines, but the guitarist's down-home, acoustic sound isn't lost on this multidimensional session, appearing in full on "Root One" to round out what's likely his most diverse album ever.

 

Reviews

 

05/12/2001 LARRY NAI - NEW YORK PRESS

While the tag, with Archie Shepp and Henry Threadgill on the cover of Boom Bop might make pulses of a certain age quicken with anticipation, the two saxophonists dont play together on the disc. However, the handful of appearances by each, on this bewitching set of Afrocentric music, provides the icing on a cake whose many layers seem injected with hallucinogens. As befits someone whose professional resume includes work with Pee Wee Ellis, Muhal Richard Abrams, Steve Coleman and Trilok Gurtu, guitarist Bourelly brings an eclectic world-view to the table. With the great Abdourahmane Diop, from Senegal, on vocals and percussion, and a potent, uncluttered backdrop, much of the disc sounds like the Gary Bartz NTU Troop crossed with the Sun City Girls. On the hypnotic Tara, for instance, multi-tracking allows Bourelly to weave hard-edged, dirty blues licks with delicate wisps of electronic effects; the master plan is rigorously constructed, yet as spontaneous as the blink of an eye. On electric guitar, Bourellys huge, wah-wahd runs on Gumbe are wide enough to contain a river; when he turns to acoustic for the ruminative Root One, the harmonic universe he creates manages to simultaneously summon the spirits of Jimi Hendrix, and the English folk icon, Nick Drake. Shepp sounds as fluid as ever on New Afro Blu and Invisible Indivisible, where he plays off a guitar-bass-drums jam reminiscent of the boundary-pushing Jimi Hendrix Band of Gypsys. Unlike other sideman work thats found him rather superficially grafted onto the proceedings, Shepp fits perfectly into Bourellys sonic landscape, which is full of glistening, ethereal details. Threadgill is relegated to the ensemble for Silent Rain, but achieves active status on Kinetic Threadness, where his tensile, percussive interplay with Bourelly pulses like veins bulging in ones neck. Chalk this disc up as an early candidate for the years best.

 

02/11/2001 A.J. CHARON - GUITAR NOISE MAGAZINE

Bourelly's excellent effort takes you into various jazz experiences. With African and mid-eastern beats and sounds, this album offers a different kind of musical experience. Great musicianship and patterns and beats that are off the beaten road, Bourelly offers us an album of highly original moments. A very inspired and highly skillful album, Boom Bop will take you into directions jazz music often refuses to go.

 

11/08/2001 DAVID R. ADLER - ALL ABOUT JAZZ

Guitarist Jean-Paul Bourelly's ensemble combines his own heavy guitar sound and R&B-tinged vocals, the passionate African chants of Abdourahmane Diop, and the percussive drive of Samba Sock on boograboo (four large African congas with bells) and Slaka on djembe. Reggie Washington (of Steve Coleman renown) plays bass on four tracks, doubling the low end with Big Royal Talamacus on "filtered boom bass," which sounds like bass through a fuzz box. Two high-profile guest saxophonists, Archie Shepp and Henry Threadgill, appear on several tracks, enlivening the session with their free jazz sensibilities. Bourelly's work could be called freeform funk-rock, with strong hints of Hendrix and Vernon Reid, as well as the kind of focused-yet-free rhythmic attack associated with Steve Coleman and the M-Base movement. The term "boom bop" in fact captures it quite well. There's also a strong political undercurrent in Bourelly's music, which becomes overt with the rap lyrics to "Invisible Indivisible." On electric guitar, Bourelly is at his best on "Three Chambers of Diop," where his wah-wah creates a wall of sound with a unique kind of beauty. In a very different vein, his solo acoustic guitar piece "Root One" would make any Jimmy Page fan happy.

 

01/08/2001 JOHN SEKERKA -COSMIK DEBRIS, USA

West African rhythms, piercing blues edged electric guitar and a chanting rock holler vocal should not make a jazz record, but here they do. Jean-Paul Bourelly is either terribly confused, or on to something. Intertwining African and American music in such a confrontational, explosive manner (think Hendrix, not Ali Farka Toure), is a shock to the system, but as we all know, shock is good. The jazzier side of this project develops more obviously when Archie Shepp and Henry Threadgill lend their horns, but Bourelly drives each piece with his blazing, sparkle gold, guitar and a passionate voice. A big record in every sense.

 

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