HOME | ARTISTS AND BANDS | CDS BY TITLE | TOP TEN CDS | TOP TEN IN 2011 | LATEST CDS | ARTIST NEWS | JAZZ GIGS | FEATURED ARTIST | CUSTOMER INFORMATION | CONTACT | ABOUT US

This is

Artist: John Law

Date of Release: 29/06/2011

Catalogue no: 1960

Label: 33 JAZZ

Price: £12

Add to Shopping Basket

 

Track Listing

No

 

Title

Duration

1

 

J.S. Bach Concerto for two harpsichords in C, last movement

5.22

2

listen

Chorinho (Lyle Mays)

7.24

3

 

This (Pringle)

7.08

4

 

Fun at Five (Law)

5.16

5

 

Fields (Law)

5.30

6

listen

Lakes (Pat Metheny)

5.45

7

 

Betty Blue (Pringle)

5.39

8

 

Triadic Ballet (Law)

9.17

9

 

Alone (Pringle)

3.30

10

 

I Love You (Cole Porter, arr. Jason Rebello)

4.53

11

 

Bourbons and Coffee (Pringle)

4.23

12

listen

Is (Law)

7.39

 

 

 

 

Appearances by

Mark Pringle

John Law/Mark Pringle two pianos.

"combining the vocabularies of jazz and classical in a singular and seamless way, coalescing improvisational surprise and a deep elegiac musicality"

"This duet...is so full of joy that it can renew your faith not just in jazz, but music itself."



A stunning new album of two piano performances combining the talents of one of Europe’s foremost pianist/composers with one of the UK’s brightest new talents. John Law combines with a rising star of the UK jazz scene, and ex-student of his, pianist/composer Mark Pringle. Mark, commencing jazz piano studies, having won a scholarship, at Birmingham Conservatoire from September 2011, here shows his talents for both virtuoso pianism as well as delicate, advanced harmonic composition and in doing so has produced a recording of immense maturity.

The CD features, alongside original compositions by John and Mark, a stunning version of the tricky composition Chorinho, by Lyle Mays, as well as a brilliant, lively ‘straight’ performance, on two modern pianos, of the last movement of the C major double harpsichord concerto by Bach!

This is is set to become a major recording of piano jazz and heralds the start of a brilliant career for a new, young talent.

This is.. John Law and Mark Pringle.

 

Reviews

 

01/10/2011 Jakob Baekgaard

Traditionally, the art of the piano duo has been linked to classical music, and almost every significant classical composer, from Mozart to Maurice Ravel, has written music for two pianos. In jazz, however, this particular medium is somewhat rare, and although Bill Evans recorded Further Conversations with Myself (PolyGram, 1967), where he overdubbed himself on piano, decidedly pure piano duos in jazz have been scarce, with An Evening with Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea: In Concert (Columbia, 1978) being one of the more well-known highlights of the idiom.

Recently, however, with genres being dissolved and more and more classical pianists turning to jazz and vice versa, there has been a new blossoming of piano duos linked to jazz. Brad Mehldau's and Kevin Hays' Modern Music (Nonesuch, 2011) and Chick Corea's and Stefano Bollani's Orvieto (ECM, 2011) are only two of the most prominent examples of the newfound interest in the art form, but one of the strongest efforts comes from the partnership of British pianist John Law and his former student, Mark Pringle, with their album—simply titled This is—taking an encyclopedic journey through the rhythms and textures of their instruments.

It all begins with a bold reading of the third movement of J.S Bach's "Concerto for 2 Harpsichords in C." Here, the two pianists make each note stand crystal clear, while lines sing in fugal harmony, balancing rhythm, tempo and melody in a perfect manner.

From the virtuosity and polyphonic joy of Bach, the geographical location shifts from Germany to Brazil and the sun-baked joie de vivre of Lyle Mays' "Chorinho," whose dancing rhythms twirl around with breathtaking elegance. In this dance, Law and Pringle never step on each other's toes, but manage to retain both intimacy and space among the unfolding notes.

While a broad scope of musical tradition is embraced on the album, with tunes covering everything from J.S. Bach to Cole Porter, the real highlights of the album are the originals. Among them, the title tunes—Pringle's "This"; and Law's "Is"—are especially fascinating, both combining the vocabularies of jazz and classical in a singular and seamless way, coalescing improvisational surprise and a deep elegiac musicality that pays attention to every detail of their instruments' sound.

This is ends up being quite an apt description; this music could only be played by John Law and Mark Pringle.

 

24/07/2011 Phil Johnson

This duet for two pianos by the reliably excellent Law and Pringle, his stupendously talented young pupil, is so full of joy that it can renew your faith not just in jazz, but music itself.

They begin with Bach, rattling off a harpischord concerto like boogie-woogie kings Ammons and Johnson, then lead in to the flying fingers of "Chorinho" by Lyle Mays. Perhaps the highpoint is "Fun at Five" by Law, where notes seem to fly around the listening room like colours in a Kandinsky abstract.

 

register | login

 

Shopping Basket

basket: 0 items (click to modify)

Total : £0.00

FREE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE

Once you have chosen your CD you can either buy online using a credit/debit card or pay by cheque if you prefer.
All cards are processed on a secure server with Thawte authentication
We accept Visa, Visa Debit, Mastercard, Switch, Solo, JCB

In a hurry? Hate filling in forms? Worried about the internet? Need help? Call us on 020 7724 2389

 

 

 

 

 

Church Hill FarmBEAUTIFUL HOLIDAY RENTAL IN THE WYE VALLEY
www.churchillfarm.co.uk